Steve Saville

Crash Patterns

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On the rare occasions when the US stock market crashes, the crash never begins immediately after the price peak.

Falling Prices Are Natural

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The US government usually admits to “price inflation” of about 2%/year. As far as we can tell, the actual rate is probably at least 5%/year, but no more than 7%/year. Let’s say 5%/year for the sake of argument.

Comparing long-term gold-mining bull markets

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The last long-term bull market in gold-mining stocks, which ran from the early-1960s through to 1980, occurred in parallel with a major upward trend in interest rates, a steady undercurrent of “inflation” fear, and the occasional dramatic “inflation” scare.

Fantasyland for policy-makers

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As eventually happens to every dog, over the past three months the world’s policy-making fraternity has been having its day

Gold versus Industrial Metals

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The financial markets have begun 2013 in remarkably similar fashion to how they began 2010, 2011 and 2012.

The ever-changing yardstick

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To illustrate the difficulty of measuring performance in terms of the US dollar, today we are presenting three inflation-adjusted (IA) gold charts.

The idiotic notion that QE is not inflationary

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When someone says that QE (Quantitative Easing) is not inflationary they are probably claiming that it doesn’t bring about an increase in the general price level.

Money Supply Instability

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According to a recent comment by a well-respected analyst, one of the problems with using gold as money is that the supply of gold could experience large swings due to changes in mine production.

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